Music Lover’s Gift Guide

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There are plenty of gifts for the music lover on your list. Here are just some of the items you might gift this season.

For Rolling Stones Fans this year marks the first holiday season of the new Rolling Stones shop on Carnaby Street, UK. You can order gifts online too!

The Rolling Stones: GHS T-Shirt Bundle 4
40th Anniversary Goats Head Soup Bundle featuring alternative album art Tee in L/ XL for $136.

For Elton John Fans. 100 Piece Puzzle of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road Album Art.

For Bob Dylan Fans. Limited edition Moleskine notebooks featuring quotes and images of Mr. D. The price range is $22 to $37. Available at http://www.walmart.com

Moleskine  Bob Dylan Limited Edition Notebook -  Violet
Moleskine  Bob Dylan Limited Edition Notebook -  Violet
See the source image

For AC/DC fans. A Tri—Fold Wallet with chain and key fob.

Tri—fold wallet. $22.99 on Amazon.

For Metallica Fans. The band’s award-winning Blackened brand whiskey now with their new S&M2 Playlist! http://www.blackenedwhiskey.com $51.99 a bottle.

Limited Edition S&M2 Batch 106, featuring
the Metallica & San Francisco Symphony S&M2 playlist.
An award-winning blend of bourbons & ryes, finished in black brandy casks and complete with a collectible BLACKENED X S&M2 box!

Metallica and Nixon Watches. $125.

Nixon Time Teller, Black / Hardwired
Metallica Hard-Wired Edition.

Classic Rock Music: Rock Clothing & Merchandise | Hot Topic

For David Bowie Fans. This long-sleeve is available online at Hot Topic for $30.91.

Alladin Sane Long-Sleeve. $30.91.

For Queen Fans. A selection of 3 Calendars! http://www.Queenonline.com $14.99 Each.

New Queen and Freddie Mercury 2021 Calendars are now available in the Official QueenOnline Store.  The Queen calendar also comes as a Collectors Edition Record Sleeve shaped version with a Greatest Hits 2 album cover. $14.99 each.

For fans of Lady GaGa is the fragrance line EAU DE GAGA. Dangerously, audacious, the fragrance was created with Gaga’s visionary fragrance powerhouse, Haus Laboratories, world renowned for innovatively capturing the pure essence of Gaga. As an androgynous scent, Eau de Gaga represents the future of fragrance appealing to both men and women. 

Exclusively available on Amazon. The perfume is $30 per bottle.

Photo by Steven Klein. Eau de Gaga is the second fragrance created by American singer Lady Gaga. The announcement and details of the fragrance were announced on her Haus Laboratories website. The fragrance’s notes include white violet, lime, and leather, and it is marketed as being suitable for both men and women.

Lady Gaga Fame Eau de Parfum Spray for Women, 1 Ounce $139.99

Fame Perfume.

Brand: Jitonrad

Stones Open A Store

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The Rolling Stones  open their first “flagship” store, “RS No. 9 Carnaby,” at 9 Carnaby Street in London’s Soho district.

The new store, created in partnership with Bravado, Universal Music Group’s merchandise and brand management company, features all of the hallmarks of the iconic band and includes exclusive new fashion label “RS No. 9 Carnaby.”

The store is a product of the group’s long-term deal with UMG inked in 2018, which encompasses the band’s recorded-music and audio-visual catalogs, archival support, global merchandising and brand management.

The store will also introduce “Stones Red,” the official color from Pantone established from the first use of the band’s iconic logo. A collection celebrating the Rolling Stones official Pantone color along with exclusive limited-edition vinyl will also launch with the store.

The Rolling Stones said in a statement, “Soho has always encapsulated Rock ‘n’ Roll so Carnaby Street was the perfect spot for our own store.

We are confident this exciting project that our friends at Bravado have created will be an unrivaled experience for everyone to come to London and enjoy.”

Jointly curated by the Rolling Stones and Bravado, the shop follows the brand colors of red and black and the glass floor features lyrics, while the fitting rooms are adorned with album artwork.

The 1973 LP Goats Head Soup is now a deluxe box set featuring rarities, outtakes and alternative mixes from the sessions, a new stereo mix of the original album, a complete show from the accompanying tour and three previously unreleased tracks from the period.

One of the new songs, “Criss Cross,” dropped Thursday with a new video. (It was originally known to fans as “Criss Cross Man” from various bootlegs.) The other new tracks are “All the Rage” and “Scarlet,” which features guitar work by Jimmy Page.

The collections include fashion and accessories, along with a special glassware developed with Baccarat engraved with the Rolling Stones tongue logo, as well as chairs and scarves from The Soloist, and raincoats and hats from premium Swedish raincoat brand Stutterheim.

This new addition to Carnaby Street in London’s Soho District has been open since September 9th, 2020. The location was at the heart of swinging 1960’s Britain for which the band played a big part.

The Rolling Stones said in a statement, “Soho has always encapsulated Rock ‘n’ Roll so Carnaby Street was the perfect spot for our own store. We are confident this exciting project that our friends at Bravado have created will be an unrivaled experience for everyone to come to London and enjoy.”

Jointly curated by the Rolling Stones and Bravado, the shop follows the brand colors of red and black and the glass floor features lyrics.

Mat Vlasic, CEO, Bravado said: “With this innovative partnership, the Rolling Stones add yet another cultural touchpoint to their rich legacy. 

RS No. 9 Carnaby is the result of years of planning and decades of building one of the world’s most recognized brands.

 It creates a destination where fans can connect and immerse themselves in the music, style and spirit of one of the world’s most iconic and beloved bands.”

Morrison Hotel Art Gallery Grants

Backstage Access

Drawing from the archives of Pattie Boyd, Henry Diltz, Lynn Goldsmith, Neal Preston, Ken Regan, Ethan Russell, Timothy White, and other photographers granted utterly intimate access to the green rooms and sidelines where music legends are truly made, Morrison Hotel Gallery presents its latest online exhibition, Backstage Pass.

From the trans-Atlantic breakthrough of Beatlemania to the off-stage antics of rock royalty, this online exhibition of 40+ fine art images offers fans an all-access (and socially distant) glimpse behind the curtain and some of the most legendary nights in music history starting Wednesday, September 16, 2020. 

Just who are these mere mortals-turned-gods when the roar of the crowd dies away?

In many moments captured, the backstage behavior lives up to the sex, drugs, and rock and roll legend.

Jack Daniels flows freely in the Lynyrd Skynyrd and Led Zeppelin dressing rooms, while KISS romps in a wild backstage “orgy” at the Capitol Theatre.

Meanwhile, Keith Richards is ever-present – clutching a whiskey bottle with his signature cool as Tina Turner and David Bowie embrace and sip together from a bottle of champagne. 

For better or worse, rock & roll has soundtracked a shifting American culture since its mid-twentieth century genesis.

With powerhouse hits and primally-charged world tours, rockstars may be the stuff of fear, fascination and die-hard fandoms.

Freddie Mercury at Wembley Stadium 1986 by Neal Preston is $800.
Led Zeppelin by Bob Gruen is $400.

Elton John’s Jewels

Coming in November, this new career—spanning set features 60 unreleased tracks!

The entire set was hand—picked by the singer and he will release the massive 8-CD Jewel Box collection on Nov. 13 , packed with rarities from 1965-1971, deep cuts and obscure B-sides.

The 148-song set, will chronicle his early stages collaborating with lyricist Bernie Taupin, and comes with a hardcover book as well as extensive notes and track-by-track commentary by John for the two Deep Cuts discs.

It will be available in three different vinyl versions (4LP, 3LP, 2LP) as well as on digital download and streaming services, with all audio remastered at Abbey Road Studios by Grammy-winning mastering engineer Sean Magee.

The previously unreleased 1969 song “Sing Me No Sad Song,” the first taste of the collection, was released on Thursday (Sept. 17) and it provides a fascinating glimpse into John’s musical evolution. The rollicking track features lyrical precursors of both 1984’s “Sad Songs (Say So Much) and the 1976 hit “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart.”

“To delve back through every period of my career in such detail for Jewel Box has been an absolute pleasure. Hearing these long lost tracks again, I find it hard to comprehend just how prolific Bernie and I were during the early days,” John says in a statement.

“The songs just poured out of us, and the band were just unbelievable in the studio. I always want to push forward with everything I do and look to the future, but having time during lockdown to take stock and pull these moments from my memory from each era has been a joy.

As a devout record collector myself, this project has really excited me, and I couldn’t be happier with the level of craft involved in such a carefully curated, lovingly constructed boxset. I’m sure my fans will enjoy it as much as I have.”

The format of the discs is described as follows:

Discs 1 & 2: Deep Cuts – A selection of personal favorites, curated by Elton. The box set book includes a track-by-track commentary by Elton.

Discs 3, 4, and 5: Rarities 1965 -1971 – Elton’s much sought-after 1960s and early 1970s demos and music that cemented the foundations of the iconic Elton John/Bernie Taupin writing partnership. The compelling, previously unreleased, missing piece in his illustrious career. Daryl Easlea narrates this fascinating story with contributions from those who were there at the time. These discs encompass 65 songs, all but a few of which have been stored in the vaults for more than 50 years.

Most of these demos were recorded during sessions before Elton was signed to a recording contract or released his first album. Also included are the first song ever written by Elton and his debut appearance on a record (both “Come Back Baby” – 1965), Elton and Bernie’s first composition (“Scarecrow” – 1967), and newly unearthed piano/vocal demos of some of Elton’s most acclaimed songs from his early albums. The packaging appropriately contains rare archival artwork and select original lyric sheets.

Discs 6 & 7: B-Sides 1976-2005 – Non-LP tracks and flipsides, never before compiled together. Thirty-six gems that are now given another chance to sparkle – 17 previously only available on vinyl, resulting in all of Elton’s studio B-sides now being offered digitally for the first time in his career.

Disc 8: And This Is Me . . . – To coincide with the release of the updated paperback edition of Me, the final collection celebrates the songs mentioned by name by Elton in his acclaimed autobiography, closing Jewel Box with the 2020 Academy Award-winning duet with Taron Egerton, “(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again.”

The box is available on November 13. Click here for a preview: https://youtu.be/74PNORDK8lo

Bob Dylan’s Rough and Rowdy Ways —An American Classic

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Rating: 5 out of 5.
The 39th Studio Album from Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan and 42nd overall is a collection inspired by the best of Walt Whitman and William Blake. 77 minutes. Double CD/Digital Streaming.

Juke Joints Sing The Songs Of Self

“Endless unfolding of words of ages!
And mine a word of the modern, the word En-Masse.

Walt Whitman

“I Contain Multitudes” opens the record with a reference to another epic poet whose work, “Song Of Myself”, celebrates every living creature on the planet. The title of this track is a Whitman quote. The ‘I’ is used here inclusively. Evoking the value in all living things.

The songs speaks to the experience of life. Loving and hating in equal measure. Composing, painting, eating, drinking, and our bodies as vessels that contain a universe.

I love Mr. Dylan’s end to this track. You can accept this line as just playing recordings of the classical giants or perhaps it is an expression that his final chapter maybe spent composing classical pieces:

“I’ll play Beethoven’s sonatas, and Chopin’s preludes…”

The cover image for this record is important. Presented in a cinematic letter-box format, anonymous couples are dancing. They are people of color. A solitary figure is hunched over the juke trying to decide what to play or in anguish over lost love or any number of reasons you could imagine.

For the first time Bob Dylan’s name does not appear on the cover! We listeners are to focus only on the image of a juke joint interior. The name of the record seems to pop-up from the floor in vivid technicolor. The color scheme applied is simply the best ever used in his catalog of 42 records.

Once again he is creating a mythic eden seeded in the past but brought into our present. A secret place where people of color went to actually express their humanity. The Queer folk also went to these type of places to do the same. Evoking Whitman’s celebration of humanity and non-humanity alike within the dark spaces of the juke joint where all can be free together.

American Folklore’s Rough and Rowdy Ways

His choice of title reference classic folk music by way of Jimmie Rodgers. The adjectives of Rough and Rowdy are masculine in nature. Playful but potentially dangerous like people themselves. A Dylanesque wink to the underlying violence packed within the culture. Dylan loves to use folklore and tall tales for referents to his lyrics. This album is more than worthy of his best works. His mystique is intact; here now his innermost troubles are laid bare.

False Prophet

A 10 stanza poem that could have been a part of Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass.” In the sixth stanza he invokes the ‘I’ in repetition:

I searched the world over, for the holy grail, I sing songs of love, I sing songs of betrayal. Don’t care what I drink, I don’t care what I eat, I climb the mountain of swords On my bare feet.”

Mr. Dylan is baring his soul like never before throughout this record. In the verse quoted above you here his artistic declaration of mission. He once again invokes his religious beliefs too. Willing to climb a mountain of swords in bare feet is a form of stigmata.

“My Own Version Of You”

Expressing his heart’s desire to create his own Frankenstein—like creature in his image to be able to assign it the qualities he feels are required to balance the world. The lyrics here are macabre yet have a restless play about them:

I’ll take the Scarface Pacino and The Godfather Brando
Mix it up in a tank and get a robot commando

Using fictional toughs from the 1970s in ‘The Godfather’ and 1980s in ‘Scarface’ as his character ingredients expresses the raw masculine imagination at work. A modern American ethos is applied here.

Dylan appeals to Julius Caesar, St. Peter, Mr. Freud, and Mr. Marx. As usual for the Ancients to connect to the Moderns as the basis for a new brain. Politics, Religion, and Philosophy—these are the areas of human endeavor forever swirling around in Mr. Dylan’s grey matter too.

“I wanna bring someone to life, turn back the years
Do it with laughter and do it with tears

The strongest desire of all seems to be the return of older values and ideas. The masks of comedy and tragedy must always balance the equation of reality and fiction.

“I’ve Made Up My Mind To Give Myself To You

The love poem of the album is addressed to an unknown woman (or perhaps every listener). A nice ballad delivered pretty straight and dry. In contrast to all of the other songs here this track stands out as the least grim.

“I’m giving myself to you, I am
From Salt Lake City to Birmingham
From East L.A. to San Antone
I don’t think I can bear to live my life alone

Mr. Dylan has had two marriages that produced 2 grown sons. His declaration here becomes clear. He wants to give up his lonely wandering.

“Black Rider”

A 5 verse poem that reinforces letting go of youthful recklessness. The doppelganger of violent intent is warned to release its grip or be hacked to pieces. The song is the simplest one here.

“Goodbye Jimmy Reed”

A 6 verse poem expressing Mr. Dylan’s goodbye to the blues. Mr. Reed is the most influential bluesman who passed back in 1976. He is the connective blood and tissue to Mr. Dylan’s other friends, Elvis and The Rolling Stones who covered Mr. Reed’s songs.

Mother of Muses”

A poetic prayer expressed with a selfish desire to have the top muse all to himself.

Mother of Muses, wherever you are
I’ve already outlived my life by far

In seeming desperation he lays his soul out for her to see. That life has now gone on too long. He needs her injection of spirit. Perhaps to fill the void if he lets go of his former life.

“Crossing The Rubicon”

Reinforcing his connection with the Ancients via Julius Caesar again, here to express a dedication to a new and risky course. This is a 9 verse poem that Dylanologists will love parsing among themselves. The densest work in this collection. Great poetic phrasing with just the right dose of abstraction.

“Key West (Pirate Philosopher)”

4 Verses of philosophy; 4 choruses describe Key West. This is the second longest track here. It serves as Prelude to Disc 2’s opus, “Murder Most Foul”.

In such simple verse Mr. Dylan crystallizes his ways. Key West is flat land where he can keep his feet planted firmly and listen closely to a pirate radio signal for inspiration and peace.

My favorite lines make up Chorus 4:

“Key West is the place to be
If you’re looking for immortality
Key West is paradise divine
Key West is fine and fair
If you lost your mind, you’ll find it there
Key West is on the horizon line”

Throughout his years writing songs Bob Dylan embraces places real and imagined as Eden–like. Key West is now his present flashpoint in life. It represents his cohorts: Ginsberg, Corso, and Kerouac; his greatest influencers: Louis, Jimmy, and Buddy.

This song closes out Disc 1. Key West is defined by Dylan as a tonic for life. The epic track on Disc 2 acts as counterpoint to the divine.

Murder Most Foul” is a nation’s fall from grace as well as an individual’s reckoning.

Due to the length and depths of that track I gave an entire blog entry over to it.

Click here for my analysis of the 17 minute track: https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/evan-s-gate.com/1542

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Bob Dylan is that rare artist who continues to be inspired by the myriad roads travelled and the places he has seen. At once worldly and still forever in deep love with his own country, he is able to imbue his work with just the right amount of ambiguity and self—worth. He has become a true Renaissance man. I am a grateful listener.

Album Cover Art In Our Digital Age

Since the 1960s the covers of long-playing records have undergone many changes.

Before the Beatles and Stones most records were just simple photographic images of the band leaders or crooners of the period.

During the 1960s when the counter-culture movement arrived albums underwent a major alteration.

The new artists had album covers that were more than just their mugs in close-up.

Before I continue let me be clear about what the cover of a record means to me.

I think covers are a canvas to be used to draw in would be listeners. It does not have to be literal or easy to understand.

After decades of releases before the internet we have thousands of covers to gawk at in pleasure and disgust.

The images can excite, enlighten, and become stand alone pieces of art.

In some cases they can also offend certain sensibilities.

The Beatles’ infamous butcher cover was censored by their record company upon release.

Capitol records pulled this album from circulation after distributors complained the cover image was revolting. If you can find this album with the offending picture it’s worth a lot today.

Guns N Roses biggest seller, “Appetite For Destruction” had its cover banned.

It featured a cartoon image of a flower girl being raped by a robot.

Guns N Rose’s original art got banned by their label. The cross and skull art is the cover now.

The aforementioned covers became highly valued on the market for collectors.

Their rarity increased the value of original prints. Digital representation of album art will never be valuable.

Many classic (old) rock groups hired artists to paint, photograph, and collage their cover art.

Roger Dean, Derek Riggs, and the firm Hipgnosis are good examples of why artists commission painters, graphic designers and illustrators.

The progressive rock group Yes compiled a catalog of music along with covers by Roger Dean.

His dreamscapes were colorful, fantastic, and surreal. This fit well with Yes’ music.

Fragile by Yes features the above art by Roger Dean to promote a greener planet.

Derek Riggs painted the first 8 Iron Maiden album covers.

His art became instantly part of the band’s image.

Each cover features the mascot Eddie, a decaying corpse reanimated back to life.

The art collective Hipgnosis was hired by British art rock icons Pink Floyd.

The indelible photographic elements are imprinted on the memory of any classic rock fan forever.

Their cover images include a cow for Atom Mother, a flying pig for Animals, and a prism for Dark Side of the Moon.

The records pictured above included extras you cannot enjoy digitally.

Styx and Pink Floyd had posters within their sleeves.

One more artist I want to mention is Michael Doret a designer, lettering artist, and illustrator based in Los Angeles, California.

He has created logos, album covers, magazine covers, and art for various brands in media, advertising, and sports.

The illustration he created for Kiss in 1978 was so eye catching the band worked with him again in the 21st Century!

Rock N Roll Over by Kiss was the last album in which all four original members performed. Ace Frehley had no writing credit.

Sonic Boom was released in 2009. The art is sort of a follow up to its 1970s predecessor.

On vinyl the album was issued with vinyl platters in six different colors.

The Rock N Roll Over album was reissued in 2015, complete with a sheet of full color stickers replicating the cover art.

The art is the original size meant for public view when it’s on a physical item.

Digital cannot transmit how vivid these covers actually appear.

Many albums have gatefold sleeves. This means they open up to show a two panel artwork.

Queen used an image by scifi illustrator Frank Kelly for News of the World in 1977. A two panel gatefold is featured.

Today album frames are sold as a means to display album cover art.

There are many examples of art for record covers. I have covered a few of my favorites for this article.

Keep in mind none of this art looks great in digital form. In physical presence you must stop and stare.

Record albums are cherished items. The extra goodies inside like posters are really cool too.

To be fair, digital music files can show the art. It’s tiny and trapped under the glass of your smart device.

MP3 files can become corrupted. I have had to stop my PC many times due to bad playback.

Records force you to take better care of your music.

It is much more of an experience to play an album on a turntable. You value it more. And the art is for keeps!

Rolling Stones Gather No Moss

“HONK” by Rolling Stones. Seen here in its triple vinyl configuration.

Career-spanning are the key words for compilation albums. You earn this type of release by outlasting your contemporaries. A group builds their legacy by putting out recordings year after year. They perform live concerts in support of their latest work. If music journalists are writing about them perhaps they can influence listeners to keep buying their goods.

In the case of Rolling Stones all the years have added up to this moment with the release of a new best-of compilation LP, Honk, on April 19th via Polydor/Interscope. The career-spanning project is available as a single-CD and 2-LP edition featuring 20 songs, along with a deluxe 3-CD/4-LP set with 46 cuts.

This album covers the band’s output from 1971 until 2016. There are songs taken from their recent tours as well.

Perhaps no band has been able to stay in the good graces of its dedicated public more than The Stones. I think they have remained true to themselves. Their last studio effort was 2016’s “Blue & Lonesome” which brought them full circle. A collection of blues covers that remind listeners what they are at their core is a blues rock fusion.

How you perceive them today depends on when you entered their story. The first Stones compilation for me was “Hot Rocks” which covered their hits from the 1960s up until 1971. I became a regular buyer of their music after hearing this record. According to Wikipedia it’s the band’s best-selling record selling 6 million copies in the U.S. since its release (12x Platinum).

There would be other best of type records in the future. Every generation has been introduced to The Stones since 1962. Over 50 years since their inception they show time and again why they are still here. The first true career-spanning hits album came with 40 Licks. It boasted 4 new songs; always an enticement for longstanding fans of a group who already own most of the music. “Don’t Stop” was one of those tracks that provided an answer to their critics.

Proving that they were not just putting out another compilation they toured in support of it. Money is a component crucial to a band’s survival. Rolling Stones did not control their 1960s output. From the 1970s onward they gained control of their recordings.

To be honest I loved their music despite the ever changing climate of pop culture. Their early material remains evergreen. In my teens I witnessed the closest they ever came to breaking up. At the time very few cared since they were not considered relevant. Their 1989 comeback “Steel Wheels” allowed me to see them finally.

Honk includes their hits from the 1980s through 2016. And live recordings from their past two decades as a stadium staple around the world. Including a live performance of “Wild Horses” with Florence Welch (Flo And The Machine); “Beast Of Burden” with Ed Sheeran; “Bitch” with Dave Grohl.

Now Sir Mick Jagger, at 75, after heart surgery shows no signs of slowing. Yes, their current U.S. tour was postponed. But Honk allows a sweet reminder of why we still care. Their latter output is all here. Hey this is only rock n roll, but we like it!

Check out Pitchfork’s list of Stones songs that don’t sound like the Stones here:
https://news.yahoo.com/best-rolling-stones-songs-don-050000268.html

Here is all the info on Honk:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honk_(album)

“Start Me Up”, “It’s Only Rock N Roll”, “Gimme Shelter”, “Tumblin’Dice”, “Fool To Cry” etc etc etc.”Undercover”, “Mixed Emotions”, “Saint Of Me”, “Streets of Love” etc etc etc

Twilight of the Rock Era?/ Essay

This art by Howard Teman frames a multitude of rock n roll’s most famous and enduring musicians.

While listening to Rolling Stones’ mono recordings of classic rock and blues numbers I began again to wonder if the rock era was ending. I have pondered this a lot. My first exposure to this music was back in a classroom. A teacher was absent. The substitute taught us about The Beatles and Bob Dylan. Then my eldest brother had begun to amass a record collection.

From The Beatles, Rolling Stones and Beach Boys to Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith, I would get to hear the rockers who impacted the culture from the 1960s thru the 1980s. These would prove to be years of developing my listening skills. I would also develop my taste for all things rock and roll.

Back in the 1970s there were rock radio stations and record stores. Cable television was just beginning and there was no music television outside of programs like American Bandstand, Soul Train, Don Kirschner’s Rock Concert and America’s Top Ten.

My main influence was mix tapes of The Doors and the one hit wonders of the day. Singles were sold for a buck on 45 r.p.m. records at local shops. Bands like The Bay City Rollers, Pilot, Paper Lace, and many, many others supplied pop hits of the day.

Are things all that different today? Singles can be had online nowadays for a similar price. Pop hits still make up the majority of what kids hear today. The big difference I think is the waning of rock dominance. Commercially the days of big rock bands was the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. An extraordinary run of success including Jam bands and Heavy metal too!

I have heard journalists, artists, and fans alike ask if the rock era is over. If it is over I feel very strongly that its run had quite an impact on today’s culture.

I also think perhaps that rock has returned to a less commercial state. Not necessarily a bad thing. If you are a fan of rock you will search for it. In record stores there are thousands of rock records. All of the now recognized milestone albums are present. For better or worse there is a rock hall that enshrines artists who have had the largest cultural influence of all. When the times have truly passed this will remain as a testament to what rock created.

In my opinion, the best bands all seem to last 10 to 20 years with an output of anywhere from 8 to 16 albums. And a long trail of concert performances in venues of varying size all over the world. In fact some bands have managed to stay around longer. They are few. Age will eventually end most of these artists. There is no science to suggest why some bands end after their peak and why a few others endure for decades.

The question really becomes who will take their place? The rock era now sees the end of touring for Kiss, Elton John, and Black Sabbath. Other acts are sure to follow. Legacy bands like Grateful Dead, Queen, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, The Who and AC/DC are still creating tours. The music of these artists are licensed for commercial use in TV and Movies.

Metallica are producing records and tours with great success after 30 plus years. Iron Maiden are arguably the biggest heavy rock act still creating music and touring after 44 years and 16 albums….the world’s greatest rock n roll band, The Rolling Stones, are the oldest touring/recording act for over 50 years!

The Who famously exclaimed ‘Rock is dead they say…Long Live Rock!’ Every band that forms with the aspiration to be the next big thing has a long hard road ahead to be sure. But with newer acts on the visible horizon who is to really say that an era is ending. The classic rock era may be in twilight but whatever we call the next chapter it will probably rock us all.

Today there are rock music festivals held every year in the USA, Germany, UK, Ireland, Canada, and Sweden.

Rock Stars At Home/ Book Review

Elton John with his wardrobe; a fan made doll in his likeness is perched on his shoulder.

In this new hardcover from Apollo publishing, the domestic lives of rock stars are exhibited. This is a nicely laid out coffee table affair with fine photographic images of many of the world’s most famous music stars from the past 50 years. A total of 176 pages. Lists for $24.95.

For the fan and non-fan alike. The histories of various properties like Cotchford Farm, former home of Winnie-the-Pooh author A.A. Milne which became the estate of then Rolling Stone founder Brian Jones. The material within is quite a page turner. You get to find out what became of their homes after they died or whether they just left to live elsewhere.

There are essays by:

  • Chris Charlesworth (Melody Maker; Omnibus Press).
  • Eddi Fiegel (The Telegraph; The Guardian).
  • Colin Salter (The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock).
  • Daryl Easlea (Music Journalist and author of Books about Michael Jackson and Peter Gabriel).
  • Bryan Reesman (Entertainment Journalist).
  • Simon Spence (BBC, NME) music journalist and author.

A survey of stars including Frank Sinatra, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Ike & Tina Turner, Jimi Hendrix, Rod Stewart, David Bowie, Prince, Elton John, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Keith Moon, The Allman Brothers, Noel Gallagher, Debbie Harry, Barry Gibb, Michael Jackson, The Jacksons, Freddie Mercury, Motley Crue, Ozzy Osbourne, and many others.

The material presented here is well organized. Essays precede each group of artists. Titled in order of appearance: Through The Keyhole, Psychedelic Suburbia, The Laurel Canyon Scene, Haunted Houses & Magic Mansions, All Aboard The Starship, Punk Digs & Dives, Out Of View, Islands & Exiles, Riot On Sunset, Last Known Abode, Musical Playgrounds, Mysterious & Spooky, and Colorfully Enhanced Cribs.

You begin to glean solid knowledge of the reasons why these people bought these homes and decorated them. The number one reason why some of these stars sought remote places was privacy. To escape the adoring public; to escape the press. Some of them would stay in the same home until their deaths like Jimi Hendrix did with his London flat. George Harrison’s widow Olivia still lives in their palatial estate. The birdseye view of this home is worth the price of this book alone.

Speaking of public museums you realize that some stars have a lot in common even if their musical expressions were different. Elvis, Prince, and Jimi Hendrix all had homes that would open to the public as historic places of interest after their untimely deaths.

The Eagles, The Doors, The Mamas & The Papas, Joni Mitchell, Frank Zappa, and Carole King were neighbors in Laurel Canyon, Ca. This is an amazing time capsule of a very unique period of time where so many creative people could afford the homes that existed here. This is an example of a time when famous people had an open door too. They did not have walls.

Frank Sinatra and Keith Richards both eventually built walls in their very different places of residence to keep out intruders. Bob Dylan would move after fans discovered his then unknown residence in the town of Woodstock, N.Y. Mr. Dylan then sought seclusion. Chuck Berry like Sinatra (Twin Palms) named his estate. Berryland was open to the public until a massive fire destroyed it. This survey relates a lot of interesting stories like this throughout its pages.

Did you know that in the 1950s’ throught the 1970’s a lot of artists opened their homes to public viewing and parties. And that John Lennon’s murder in 1980 led many of these artists to close their homes as a result?

I can highly recommend this book as the type of treasure you can pick up for an insightful and fun tour of homes and people you may not have had access to otherwise unless you go to Graceland or Paisley Park. There is such a wealth of tidbits throughout that you will never get bored.

The misfits who began careers in music never expected to become wealthy. The galaxy of stars in this book represent a small sample of those who did well.

You realize in the end home is where you feel safe and comfortable. This book will make you feel this way and so much more!